Wednesday, February 17, 2010


The Anatomy of a Vector Illustration Part 3

Objects And Their Properties, Paths And Subpaths
Continuing with the anatomy of a vector illustration, let's take a look at objects and their properties, paths and subpaths.
Objects - Stroke and Fill Properties
Objects have stroke and fill properties. Stroke (or outline) properties apply to the path of an object and fill properties apply to the area enclosed by the path.

Stroke Properties:
    Weight (line thickness)
    Solid vs. Dashed
    Line Caps and Corners:

Except for differences in terminology, line cap and corner properties are the same between Deneba Canvas™, Adobe® Illustrator®, CorelDRAW and Macromedia® FreeHand®:
FreeHand Deneba
  "Caps and
"Cap and Join" "Cap and Join" "Line Joins and
End Caps"
butt.gif Square Butt Butt Flat
square.gif Extended
Projecting Square Square
rounded.gif Rounded Round Round Round
miter.gif Mitered Miter Miter Miter
bevel.gif Beveled Bevel Bevel Bevel
round.gif Rounded Round Round Round

Fill Properties:

    Uniform or Gradient Fill
    Patterns and Textures
Stroke Examples: (fill = uniform or none)
Solid Dashed None Pattern*
fills01.gif fills02.gif fills03.gif fills04.gif
* Pattern stroke unavailable in CorelDRAW

Fill Examples: (stroke = none)


fills05.gif fills06.gif fills07.gif fills08.gif
* Vector texture fill available in CorelDRAW only

It could be said that Tiles are one of the basic fill properties. Patterns and tiles are basically the same kind of fill.

Deneba Canvas Stroke and Fill Examples:

Canvas is unique in that it can apply the same properties to strokes as it can to fills. In addition to colors, textures and gradients, you can also apply symbols and hatch patterns as strokes and fills. Below are a few examples:

Texture Fill
Gradient Fill
Solid Stroke
Gradient Fill
Gradient Stroke

Hatch Fill
fills09.gif fills11.gif fills10.gif fills12.gif
Paths and Subpaths
Paths are either:

1. Open or
2. Closed

Fills are not restricted to closed paths. Open paths can be filled just like closed paths:
Paths of an object having more than one path are called subpaths.

postit.gif   Note: Subpaths are nothing more than discreet, individual paths in an object composed of more than one path. The word "subpath" is easily misunderstood because the prefix "sub" implies subordination. Multiple paths within an object are of equal hierarchy (rank).
By default each path becomes a new object when it is first created. Subpaths are created when objects are formed from composite paths.

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